Thursday, July 25, 2013

When Beauty Takes Root


Penny, a blogging friend, has challenged her readers to do whatever they can to establish a wildlife habitat right where they're at. No matter the size, whether a flower basket on the balcony of an apartment, or an oasis in your little corner of the world, we can all do something to create a healthier planet for all its inhabitants and add to the beauty of this world. I encourage you to pay a visit to her blog. Then, see what you can do to meet her challenge and even spread the word.

http://lifeonthecutoff.wordpress.com/2013/07/25/a-challenge/


Photograph by Penny.


25 comments:

  1. I've been worried about the wooded lot next door. Several trees and lots of branches have fallen down opening up a clearing in the middle. This has completely changing the character of the lot.
    I'm conflicted about whether it's best to leave it to new growth, no matter what that might be, or if I should try planting bird and squirrel friendly habitat. But, then it's not my lot and Nature will take its course.

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    1. There is often that fine line between aesthetics and nature's course, isn't there, Ms. Sparrow? I'd muddle about this as well with a neighboring lot, however, I'm thinking that it is already a bird and squirrel refuge as it is and that the fallen trees and branches are providing areas of shelter for others.

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  2. We have a certified wildlife habitat on our one-third acre.

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    1. Yea! Good for you, Linda - and thank you.

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  3. It is amazing what little it takes. I have done small beds up to 160 acres. The love is always in these plots no matter what size, so they have a very nice feel to them.

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    1. I sneak in for a walk on your prairie once in awhile and am always amazed and inspired. Yes, indeed, it is "amazing what little it takes".

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  4. Welll done Penny, I am off to look at her blog. It doesn't matter how small a patch, one can do something to preserve wildlife.

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    1. Exactly, Cait! Every little thing helps and we are all better for it. Thank you.

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  5. Thank you for linking to my post and challenge. Your affirming words here, and in all of your posts, bring beauty, thoughtfulness, and the poetry of life. I appreciate this, but, more importantly, all of nature will. Thank you, again, Teresa.


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    1. Thank you, Penny. And thank you to those who have read and commented.

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  6. I'm off to her web page, and I do thank you so much for this inspiring post. My little flower garden has taken on new meaning. :-)

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    1. I'm smiling here at the thought of you flower garden.

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  7. Fantastic idea! We've planted alot of pollinator plants (and raise honeybees), avoid chemical fertilizers, feed the birds religiously October-April, and put up birdhouses. But there's always more to be done!

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  8. This is a wonderful idea and I am so happy to pass it on ...

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  9. Yes, we do need more nature in our lives and it's possible no matter where you live. Today I was in a nearby small town and saw that one of the street medians was planted with flowers - and that some of the flowers had reseeded in the dirt in the street, along the edge of the curb. If plants can grow in the street, they can grown on a balcony and even a windowsill.

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    1. I appreciate your comment, Cherie. Thank you. I always stop and look at the plants that reseed (we call them volunteers), especially when they cling to life and bring about some beauty in a place that seems inhospitable.

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  10. Living in an apartment with a tiny balcony makes it tough. But I have found a couple of things worth doing. In a nearby breezeway, I've placed three big pots of Cape Honeysuckle. When they bloom, they attract bees, of course, but also the occasional hummingbird. And I always have fresh water available for the birds. I can't feed as I'd like, because of concerns about attracting critters down below (and making my downstairs neighbors unhappy!) but through the winter and nesting season, I put out raw peanuts, shelled sunflower and such until the babies have fledged and the new crop of natural food is available.

    It's fun, and it does help. I'm in the process of clearing out some non-blooming plants (like Century plants and schefflera) in order to bring in bloomers that would be more favored by bees and butterflies. I've never seen a butterfly up here, but that's no to say I couldn't. To paraphrase - if you plant it, they will come.

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    1. Your efforts are like music. Can you hear my applause. These are exactly the kinds of things that can be done. I imagine the honeysuckle also emits a intoxicating fragrance and you are giving a head start to those birds. I hope you see a butterfly up there - and thank you for your crusade for pollinators.

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  11. This is wonderful! May her challenge generate many of these and may nature smile on them all. :)

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  12. Thank you all for responding to Penny's blogpost and her challenge.

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    1. I'll second that, Teresa. Thank you, one and all.

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  13. When I moved here, on Bear Mountain in Ky, I set up a Wildlife Habitat. I had a few acres of pasture land that were bland and lackluster -- in other words no real wild plants to attract the surrounding wild ones. Lots of woods were on my property and knowing that many critters like "edges" near woods I decided to let the pasture go wild with no interference from humans. I have frankly been stunned by the plant beauty that has evolved on those acres over the last six years with an increase in critters, both air-borne and grounded. There is a wonderful book out about a woman that let her land return to nature. It is titled "Inland Island." I highly recommend it. It's a marvelous read. Great that Penny is encouraging wildness. Hope that many follow her lead. Good post -- barbara

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    1. That sounds like a book I'd like to read. Thanks for mentioning it!

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    2. Thank you - and thanks for the book recommendation. I have it on my list, hoping to find it soon.

      I loved reading about your efforts to return to nature and your respect of it. Penny

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