Sunday, March 25, 2012

Where the Lawn Meets the Meadow



Spring is here and the red-winged blackbirds have returned, having arrived outside my kitchen window some time last week. They fly to the feeder every morning, flaunting their red and yellow shoulder pads, then leave it to the finches and several others that congregate there for the remainder of the day, not returning until early evening.

Several trumpeter swans flew over again yesterday followed by sandhill cranes, too high to see beneath a gray flannel sky, but not so much that I couldn't hear their distinctive sound. And last night, just after dark, I stepped out onto the porch in time to hear Canada geese passing overhead. I could almost feel their wings pressing them onward through the night.

The deer have gotten a little braver and I now see them browsing in the backyard just before sunup. Their droppings in the meadow behind the house, along with signs of a red fox I believe may be living nearby, have been joined recently by fresh bear scat. The path that the animals all seem to use behind the house, where the lawn meets the meadow, have more than a few indications of its return.

Buddy and I continue to take our walks in the meadow, then follow the fence line looking for crows in the field and on through the plantation of smaller Norway pines, most of which are now between fifteen and twenty feet high. They form a nice canopy for the deer where they bed down at night. I love seeing those little ovals of grass formed by their warm bodies. When the smallest of the ovals show up, I know that fawns have been born. I can well imagine the protection the small family of deer provides for them in case the coyotes venture too near. They all seem to have developed a respect for one another, no signs of otherwise, so I will continue to see it that way and hope they will, too.

Spring also means a return to yard work, but my friend, Anne Robey, from New Mexico, suggested we see this ongoing work as the work of eternity, which is really suggesting we keep it in the now, all that really exists. Having no constraints of time, except those we foolishly impose upon ourselves, allows us to let go, with no expectation of anything but our growing awareness of the ever-unfolding beauty all around us.

Our mutual friend, Jamie Ross, an uncommonly fine poet, wrote last evening of his impending return from San Miguel de Allende to the cold, clear waters of the Vallecitos River that runs through the Carson National Forest near his home. He wrote of listening to our instincts and allowing the form of our writing to simply emerge. It's the season of returning.

For the past few days, I've had a song stuck in my head, a song from my much younger days, when George Jones was on every jukebox, as well as our turntable at home. I've been singing it to Buddy and, so far, he hasn't started howling. He has, however, spent an inordinate amount of time out on the porch. I'll spare you my version. Here's George:



50 comments:

  1. What fabulous photo! Is that Buddy on the meadow path?

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  2. I did feel like I had walked through your world with you where the lawn meets the meadow and it was a pleasant trip with Buddy leading the way. Lovely!! :)

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  3. You are incredibly in tune with nature. What a gift!

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  4. I was shocked to see George look so young. As though he never was.

    It's so silly that I never imagine swans flying overhead, always just existing in some pond.

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    1. Yes, they simply swim in endless idyllic circles. Their flying is just for our amusement. :)

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  5. You and Buddy have a beautiful spot for yourselves. I am glad it is inhabited by someone who cherishes it.

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  6. Wow, so great to have wild animals just beyond your lawn. Never take it for granted. Its such a gift. I always used to enjoy those days of yardwork as an opportunity to tune in to nature as well. You notice so much more going on in the animal kingdom as you busy yourself with what needs to be done in the garden.

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    1. I have the perfect opportunity here, plus it's a natural gym. No additional equipment required. :)

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  7. Hello Teresa:
    This really does seem like a communion with Nature, and how wonderful is that. Your immediate environment sounds to be absolutely idyllic and in it, we can well believe, time, as we construe it, has little meaning.

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    1. I am very blessed to have this place where "time" is only arranged by nature itself.

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  8. I love the way that Spring seems to arrive in unison all over the northern hemisphere, somehow shortening the distances between lives and continents and allowing us all to share that wonderful feeling of renewal and arrival.

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    1. Absolutely so, Alan. I'm glad the distances between our places has shortened.

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  9. How wonderful that you are enjoying spring Teresa! We had spring for a few weeks. Then it disappeared with a big snow fall. I hope it hurries back soon! :)
    xo Catherine

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    1. It's a tad cooler here, but no late snowfall yet. Things are greening up nicely. It will return. It always does. :)

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  10. Spring came and left here in New England. Should drop back into teens tonight or tomorrow night, but will return again.

    Waiting for words. The story of my life. I have learned you can't force them.

    Liked this George Jones tune, a real surprise to me!

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    1. When the words do return, and they will, I look forward to reading them. In the meantime, walking through the world is more than sufficient, as you well know.

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  11. Lovely springtime images. I felt like I was walking with you. George Jones is a classic. Reminds me of my dad, another George, and his love of music.

    Play off the Page

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    1. Yes, George is a classic. His singing still moves me.

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  12. Spring is a magical time
    That can take one's breath away-
    A time of rebirth and renewal
    And the joy of birds at play.

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  13. What a lovely yard you have. It is 80 already here, so not sure if spring will be around or just going right to summer.Like the tune, a good friend taught himself guitar to George.

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    1. 80? That sounds inviting. We have taken a turn to the colder side today, but I'm going to appreciate not feeling pressured to do any gardening prematurely.

      Learning guitar to George...you can't go wrong there.

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  14. Ah, Teresa, if not for the bear scat you could be describing my own little acreage. We heard the Sandhill cranes again a few days ago. I couldn't tell if the spots I was seeing up high were them or my floaters.

    In line with a few other commenters, spring came and left. Actually, it was more like summer left and spring finally arrived here. The daffodils are all but spent for the heat and the rain did in the magnolias. I'm trying very hard to stay in the moment and just enjoy what is.

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    1. I'm giggling a bit. I have floaters, too....

      It's colder here today, but as I mentioned to Steve, above, I'm appreciating not feeling pressured to be outside, although I am champing at the bit... a bit. :) Yes, staying in the moment we are.

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  15. Dear Teresa, . . . your posting today was lyrically beautiful. I could see the a poem there within the prose lines. The birds, the deer, the coyotes, the fox, and you and Buddy all within the moment of awareness.

    Thank you for sharing with us the bounty of nature beyond the walls of your home.

    Peace.

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    1. Thank you, Dee. I have looked at a few posts where I could see the poem within. Perhaps in much of prose there is a poem contained within, easily freed when seen in a new light.

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  16. Here in England Spring is like summer.So Hot! I Wish us all warmth+ sunshine for the rest of the tear! Enjoy Teresa!

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    1. Records have been set in the Upper Midwest this March, but today is quite cool and windy. Thinking Warmth and Sunshine! Thanks, Tony.

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  17. You live in a wonderful place -- nature with wild ones all around. That is how I love to live -- that is how my place is now. -- barbara

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    1. I really did find a good place to be. Though not that far from town, it is rife with wildlife.

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  18. It sounds like you really live in the wild! I love that shot of your dog. Now, I can't get that sound out of my head!

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    1. Thanks, Sandy. It's close to town, actually, but there's a sense of being in a more remote location because of the wild life.

      It kind of gets in your ear and won't let go, eh? :)

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  19. I want to come on a walk with you and Buddy!!

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    1. I always feel better after a walk with him, just getting outside can help create a shift in thought that's always uplifting. Today, Buddy did a bit more roaming away from me than I was comfortable with. He slept on my foot later to cozy up to me. :)

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  20. This is a lovely description of your early-spring days. I knew today would be much cooler, but I wasn't quite prepared for the nasty wind. Guess I'll be indoors for the next day or two. Still, things are greening up and the critters are on the move.

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    1. And tomorrow they are predicting even stronger winds. I better keep busy or I'll start baking.... :(

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  21. I must tell you, as a general rule of thumb, when I receive all my notifications I usually save reading your post till last. This resulting from me being a fan of the saving the best for last concept. And you, m'dear, never seem to fail in that regards!

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  22. Hi t, Thanks for those kind words, nice of you to say so. It means a lot because I think you're a pretty fine writer yourself. And your kids have one very cool dad.

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  23. Yes...Spring is definitely in the air. I mowed our front field over the weekend because the previous owner had planted lots of daffodils randomly and you can't get in there with the riding mower. So, I pushed the gas mower, picking up fallen branches and pine cones and even seeing a dead bird at the edge of the field. That always saddens me. But you are right about allowing the trees to provide protection for all the animals. And I love that phrase about eternity. Yes...we need to view all this stuff we do each day not as work or as a chore but just the "work of eternity". It puts such a better spin on it, doesn't it? I enjoyed being outside for the whole day and seeing all the budding fruit trees. Having just moved here last year, there are still so many new things to discover with every season. We had a heck of a wind and rain storm yesterday and last night though. And they say more to come.

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    1. Yesterday was a day of picking up branches for me, along with cleaning out a neglected perennial bed in the back. I have a ways to go to restore it. I look forward to the fruit trees budding. The lilacs are just showing a bit of green tips now. Cooler and windy the last two days, but plenty of "time." :) Thanks, Teri.

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  24. Spring has come to Minnesota, and while it wasn't a hard winter -- or much of a winter at all -- it doesn't take away from the joy of seeing GREEN outside! :-) The cardinals are calling, the robins are hopping, and the city rabbits are working out which of my awakening plants to eat first.

    Spring!!

    Pearl

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    1. Hey there, fellow Minnesotan. It really is a nice time. Those silly city rabbits, they must have taken lessons from their country cousins which inhabit my yard. Thanks, Pearl.

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  25. I'll try to keep the work of eternity in my mind, I was mesmerized with a few mushrooms today and will post them tomorrow, I am sure you will like them, as I was reading Walt Whitman's quote on your sidebar as I was thinking of them.

    never hear that song before today, a pleasant walk it is.

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    1. I look forward to your mushrooms. I never tire of eating them and they are endlessly interesting to me. Thanks, Linda.

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