Wednesday, August 3, 2011

A Picture is Worth a Thousand Words



Photograph: Margaret Bourke-White, Breadline in Kentucky 1937
 


And the beat goes on....




35 comments:

  1. This picture defines how I'm feeling today. The look on their faces in that line...I see this look often around the city. The anger levels are at the boiling point. I'm watching my kids struggle...the first generation not living better than their parents generation.

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  2. I've always thought that was a wonderful photo. It is sad to realise it has resonance to modern day Americans. I think many people in many parts of the world are also feeling the pinch.

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  3. America was built with the blood sweat and tears by people of color.
    But, it fruits were/are to be enjoyed by a select few.
    Progressive thoughts and actions are what gave us some sort of civility.
    Now that civility is being taken away by the select few.

    Jenny
    This is not a "pinch".
    Without Soc.Sec. Unemployment Insurance, Medicare, Medicaid, and other safety nets.
    We would be in a worst depression than the big one.

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  4. KARENA, It was getting to me today. I have been thinking of posting this for awhile, but today seemed right. I'm grateful for your comments.



    JENNY, From what I understand you are feeling it over there, as well. We are not entirely alone in our terrible circumstances. One of the hardest parts for me is to see how very dysfunctional our political process has become and to be bitterly disappointed by those I believed might actually make a difference. Thank you for commenting.



    RZ, Thank you for visiting and commenting. Good points.

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  5. Teresa, I am unable to follow the news right now, because I am so sad for all of us. The whole debacle we just went through... it's only the beginning. For now, I am going to concentrate on the sunshine and blue skies that I'm seeing outside. I love your posts. They are always right on.

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  6. I also can't watch the news too often. Nowadays, you have to wonder if by the time you get to the front of the line if there will be anything remaining.

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  7. DJan, I've watched more than usual and it's been tough. Thanks for your positive notes.

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  8. Linda, I'm often torn: should I watch/listen and read, knowing I become too emotionally involved or let it all go and just tend to my own life. It's not easy, either way.

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  9. This picture has always touched me.

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  10. I don't think that this is America's finest hour, and I feel betrayed by our politicians. Great photo to reflect how many of us are feeling.

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  11. Indeed. I sometimes think that history should be taught in schools with nothing other than picture books.

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  12. PENNY, BOSSY BETTY AND KATE, Thanks so much for commenting. It seems to be where so many of our thoughts and feelings are at. Betrayed, yes.



    ALAN, Your comment gave me goosebumps as I thought immediately of some very strong images that would, indeed, be excellent teachers. I think this is a brilliant idea. I mean that. Thank you.

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  13. A great photographer and greater images spells art ...

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  14. Paul, She was good, as were Dorothea Lange and a few others. B&W photographs tell important stories.

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  15. Teresa: One of the best photographs ever showing the disparity of wealth and faded dreams. Good for you to put this on your blog! The stock market is headed down today, children are starving and a lot of people have their TV on looking at silly afternoon shows. You have the good sense, taste and passion to post a revealing photograph of America.

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  16. Thank you, Jack. So good to hear from you. I know you're trying to find some light at the end of the tunnel there on your Texas ranch. Thank you for reminding us today of life's beauty, too.

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  17. history does repeat itself; the political system has been dsyfunctional for a very long while; there is an email going around proposing points below, most of which I think is a grand idea from the very top on down to all politicians. We all, everyone of us Americans, need to start a petition to stop what's going on and make changes for the better of our country.

    1. No Tenure / No Pension.
    A Congressman collects a salary while in office and receives no pay when they are out of office.

    2. Congress (past, present & future) participates in Social Security.
    All funds in the Congressional retirement fund move to the Social Security system immediately. All future funds flow into the Social Security system, and Congress participates with the American people. It may not be used for any other purpose.

    3. Congress can purchase their own retirement plan, just as all Americans do.

    4. Congress will no longer vote themselves a pay raise. Congressional pay will rise by the lower of CPI or 3%.

    5. Congress loses their current health care system and participates in the same health care system as the American people.

    6. Congress must equally abide by all laws they impose on the American people.

    7. All contracts with past and present Congressmen are void effective 1/1/12.
    The American people did not make this contract with Congressmen. Congressmen made all these contracts for themselves. Serving in Congress is an honor, not a career. The Founding Fathers envisioned citizen legislators, so ours should serve their term(s), then go home and back to work.

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  18. Thanks for posting this because I think it is exactly what most of us are thinking. What has become of us? It's not easy to be "proud to be an American" anymore. I saw an email come through the other day that asked us all to stop purchasing items not made in America. Really...what would one month do? It might send a message but then, like a flash, everyone would forget what it was they were protesting about. We have such short term memories sometimes. My SIL got his pink slip and has been applying for teaching positions and still has not been called back to work. And because he lost his insurance because of it my daughter is now having to pay for the family's insurance with her job. Can you believe (and this is AFTER her jobs share of the insurance premium!!!) that her portion of the monthly payment is ONE THOUSAND DOLLARS? For a family of 3? How is a family supposed to make it on one salary that has a huge chunk of cash eliminated because politicians cannot come to an agreement about jobs, spending, health care, etc? We should be ashamed of ourselves!!! Will we remember what this was all about when it comes time to vote those people out of Congress? I doubt it! Remember what I said about short term memory??? Can you believe that they are all on vacation now for 6 weeks???? Shame on them! Shame on them!!!

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  19. Faded Dreams Both Sides Of The Pond.God! Your TeaPARTY people a weird (we have similar in England too!)

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  20. Linda, I've seen this petition before. I agree with everything. The problem is, with the fox in charge of the chicken coop nothing will ever change. I fear it will take nothing short of catastrophe. And I think we're pretty close, but people have been lulled to sleep by their televisions and the ongoing smugness of those who still say, "I've got mine, sucks to be you." Meanwhile, homeless children sleep in their cars with their parents who hope for jobs that will never come.

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  21. Teri, I knew we were in trouble when health Care reform quietly became health Insurance reform. And the only reform that came about was by requiring people to buy into a very faulty, greedy system. Who can possibly afford health insurance? Only the rich or those who are employed by the government, in most cases. Asking us to buy only made in America is a great idea, but it's like putting a band-aid on a severed aorta. Yes, shame on them.

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  22. Tony, It's weird wherever you go.... yes, both sides of the pond. I hope against hope that all this tumult leads to something better, ultimately. But, it won't be coming from any government, only individuals can do it for themselves, however they can.

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  23. Hi TE. I love the photo, respect the sentiments, but refuse to be saddened by it. We've got a lot of challenges ahead, some of us a lot more than others, some of us more as a result of our own deliberate choices, others less so.

    I'm not evangelical about it, but my personal view is that each of us can take joy from our challenges, be grateful for them no matter how painful, how difficult. I try hard to impose this view on my own life and succeed most of the time nowadays [with occasional backsliding]

    Life's a tough gig and I don't recall anyone ever advising me that the toughest parts would be the ones I'd eventually value most highly.

    For those who have the hard times but aren't able to be grateful and joyful for them I do feel something, but I can't describe it as sadness. More akin to a hopeful metaphysical nudge in the direction of placing the emphasis somewhere it isn't yet.

    Not to say I'm wishing worse on anyone, including myself. With apologies to Robert Frost, "Let no fate willfully misunderstand me and [here my own preference imposed on his] think I'm saying THAT"

    Thanks for your visits to my blog. Without them I'd never have been blessed to find yours. For which I'm doubly blessed.

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  24. Interesting story in New York Times yesterday, showing that the approval rating for Congress has dropped to just 18 per cent. I'm doing a posting on that later today.

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  25. Jules, Thanks a million for your thoughtful response. I was congratulating myself this morning for not being as angry as I felt I had a right to be, but identified myself instead as sad, so thank you for the invaluable reminder that that isn't where it's at, either. It solves nothing. I try to find joy in the everyday of life and I have so very much to be grateful for. A metaphysical nudge was needed here, and for that, I thank you.

    That Frost quote is also a good reminder to place emphasis on what I want to see, i.e. the good in my life and everyone's life, and in so doing, Will see.

    Thanks again.

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  26. Rob-Bear, Thanks for the heads up. I'll check out both.

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  27. When I was 12, and griping about still having to use an outhouse, my dad pointed out that as a child he and his brothers had the west end of a log and his sisters the east end.

    Dad was a relativist long before Einstein. Hee Hee Hee

    Unbelievable: My sign in word, I solemnly swear, is "ooapoo."

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  28. Cletis! Thanks for the laughs. It's all about perspective.

    That sign-in word: still chuckling.

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  29. Cat, Yes, indeed, in more ways than one.

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  30. I agree with DJan. There is so much ugliness in the world, why focus on it? Give me lots of love and beauty anyday!

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  31. I wonder what would happen if every eligible voter cast a ballot in the next election. I think we're all more in the middle of the road than our elected officials wold indicate - but if only the far left and right are sufficiently motivated to go to the polls, we get what we got.

    Just my opinion, as usual.

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  32. There are only two things in "the middle of the road".

    Yellow lines, and road kill.

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  33. Thank you all for your perspectives, your comments.

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