Tuesday, November 9, 2010

The Kerze in Each of Us

Painting by Gerhard Richter,  "Kerze (Candle)"

















When I was a child, a song called, "This Little Light of Mine (I'm Gonna Let it Shine)," seemed to provide the soundtrack for my life. It followed me from Sunday School to Camp Jim and back home again. It ran through my head often, even though, at times, I didn't do so well at practicing it.  This morning, I was visiting with my friend, Anne, who lives in New Mexico. We were discussing mantras and how they can help us stay focused on a particular idea, an idea that can bring healing, or affect our lives in a positive way. She has found one recently that seems to be particularly helpful. I wondered what mine might be at this place in time. Then this song came into my head. I think it's planning to stay awhile.

A few evenings ago, I turned on the television to catch the NewsHour, on PBS. If I watch news at all, I prefer to have a more in-depth analysis and this seems to provide it. I'm not going into the slants various news agencies seem to have, I simply want to say, I believe that PBS provides a forum for civil discourse.

They often have what are referred to as, "human interest stories," of a very fine nature. I was fortunate enough to tune in just as Margaret Warner was interviewing Ingrid Betancourt. If you recall, she was the woman held hostage for over six years in a remote area of Columbia by a group known as FARC. She has written a book about her ordeal, a story of triumphing over some of the most horrific circumstances in which one could find oneself. How did she do this?  I think I'll just let Ms. Betancourt tell you. This link includes a short segment of the interview that is the crux of her story. I found it illuminating and inspiring, a profound look at transforming any circumstance.

Former Captive Ingrid Betancourt on the 'Light We Have Inside' | The Rundown News Blog | PBS NewsHour | PBS

7 comments:

  1. I watched the whole interview too, very interesting. I lived in Bogota, Colombia for a year as an exchange student back in the late 80's. Very interesting place.

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  2. Paige, Yes, I really found this interview fascinating and so inspiring. I see you're a teacher. Good for you! What the world needs, and always has, is good teachers, dedicated to creating a positive, nurturing atmosphere for their students. Your blog indicates you are definitely in your right place. Thank you for taking the time to read and comment.

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  3. This woman seems to have so much composure and peace within herself. I like how she refers to letting go of ego, cultivating the light, and going past a negative mindset.

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  4. I listened to the interview...amazing. I followed it with a search and read even more material. I think it was in one of Eckhart Tolle books, that he mentioned that sometimes, under extreme conditions, persons are able to get to this wonderful state without effort, while we(me) struggle daily with ego.

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  5. Yes, Paul, I was very impressed with her composure and grace, that quiet peace within herself - a loving and eloquent lady.

    Lynn, I think that's an important point. Extreme circumstances can call up latent abilities that allow us to transcend, and then transform, very challenging times. One's ego becomes completely irrelevant, I suppose, and then real life-altering possibilities emerge. I do like the Tolle books.

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  6. what an ordeal Ingrid had, her choices to survive are good reminders to remember the kerze within myself, thanks for the post.

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  7. Linda, It was a good reminder to myself, too! To survive this ordeal and to do so with such grace is a very powerful lesson. Thanks for your comment!

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